I first learned about Mexiqui Hostel through Instagram, the way most of us tend to learn about new hotels, restaurants and travel destinations these days.

Ahhh social media, what would we do with out you?

Another travel blogging couple I follow on Instagram, Homeless Honeymoon, had included a shot of the epic rooftop view in their story and the second I saw it I knew I wanted to stay there.

When Mexiqui Hostel offered to host my stay while I was in Mexico City a few weeks ago (more on that later), I was overjoyed. I couldn’t wait to experience this brand new hostel.

Review: Don’t Miss a Stay at Mexiqui Hostel in Mexico City | A Wandering Foreigner

Mexiqui Hostel

Arrival at Mexiqui in Mexico City, Mexico

I arrived at Mexiqui Hostel at 5:30 AM after a nine-hour bus ride from Oaxaca City. As a new hostel that only opened in May 2017, I had difficulty finding an address for it on Google Maps and was nervous about what would happen when I’d arrive at 0-dark-thirty in a new city of 22 million people. Convinced by the lack of signage at night and nondescript green door, when I did find the brightly painted yellow building, I thought I had to be in the wrong place. I think I walked back and forth outside for a solid 10-minutes until I realized, this is, in fact, the hostel.

When the 24-hour security guard let me through the door, I was pointed towards reception and quickly checked-in. I was lead to my third-floor room as one of the staff members gave me a quick overview of the hostel and its policies.

I walked into my nine-bed dorm room delighted to find it empty, leaving me with a giant non-private, private room. After four-months of hostel dorms, having an empty room is like God’s gift to you.

Just one of the many playful dorm rooms in Mexiqui Hostel

Waking up with this view out your window is pretty special!

A Mexiqui Overview

Mexiqui is the brainchild of its owner, Ana Cuellar, a local from Mexico City who studied abroad in Europe and spent time backpacking and traveling herself during that time. She understands the needs of backpacker and what sets apart a good hostel from a bad one. When she returned home, she met other travelers and backpackers in the area and learned about the need for a good, social, centrally-located hostel in Mexico City.

Thus, Mexiqui was born.

It’s clear when you arrive that Anna has put a lot of thought into what she wants her guests to experience when they visit, paying attention to all the details like adding custom murals throughout the hostel and its rooms to give it a one-of-a-kind feel.

Located in the literal heart of Mexico City with one of the best views of the cathedral in the entire area, Mexiqui has 62-beds and one private room. Each room has a custom designed mural by the talented local artists Alejandro Pinpon, which is appropriate given the amount of art found in Mexico City (see his Instagram here to check out more of his work).

Review: Don’t Miss a Stay at Mexiqui Hostel in Mexico City | A Wandering Foreigner

Custom murals found throughout the entire hostel

Review: Don’t Miss a Stay at Mexiqui Hostel in Mexico City | A Wandering Foreigner

Review: Don’t Miss a Stay at Mexiqui Hostel in Mexico City | A Wandering Foreigner

 

Review: Don’t Miss a Stay at Mexiqui Hostel in Mexico City | A Wandering ForeignerA Hostel That Feels Like a Hotel

The hostel is long and narrow with rooms on two floors, a common area with a couch and TV, and a small but fully functional kitchen. The bottom floor serves as an upscale cafeteria for passerby diners and guests alike. More restaurants are slated to open in the coming weeks, but currently, it offers sushi, coffee, sandwiches and crepes, tacos and tapas, and soon-to-come pizza. The cafeteria is open from 9 AM to 9 PM seven days a week.

For my budget-friendly Wanderers, the food is more expensive than what you’d get on the street, but all hostel restaurants are more expensive in general. And, the food is delicious. Plus, have I told you about the view?

The rooftop patio and bar is hands down my favorite part of the entire hostel. My mornings were spent on that rooftop with my coffee and journal, watching Mexico City leisurely wake up and begin the day. In the afternoons, it’s a lively place to enjoy drinks, tapas and meet new people. On the weekends, for my wild and crazy Wanderers, the rooftop bar is open until 2 AM.

Review: Don’t Miss a Stay at Mexiqui Hostel in Mexico City | A Wandering Foreigner

Review: Don’t Miss a Stay at Mexiqui Hostel in Mexico City | A Wandering Foreigner

The roof top bar and restaurant gives amazing views of historic Mexico City

Review: Don’t Miss a Stay at Mexiqui Hostel in Mexico City | A Wandering Foreigner

Review: Don’t Miss a Stay at Mexiqui Hostel in Mexico City | A Wandering Foreigner

Scenes from the roof top bar and restaurant

Review: Don’t Miss a Stay at Mexiqui Hostel in Mexico City | A Wandering ForeignerDo I Recommend Mexiqui Hostel?

Yes. Absolutely.

It’s more expensive than most accommodation in Mexico at $325 MXP a night, but in my opinion, it’s worth it. Besides, everything is more expensive in DF because, well, it’s a city. I was up and out the door early every morning exploring museums, parks, neighborhoods, and going on day trips, and it was a convenient treat to have a clean, nice hostel centrally located in the Zocalo district just one block from the metro. Getting from place to place was that much easier, and cheaper, and after a long day out there was a sense of relief that came over me as I’d lie on my bed exhausted from the day’s activities.

Breakfast is included in the price of your room, although it’s nothing to write home about with some corn flakes, toast, jam, Nutella, butter, instant coffee, and tea. I’ve had worse, but I’ve also had much better. But hey, I get it. They want you to eat in their cafeteria downstairs. After all, it is a business.

Oh, and did I mention they provide clean towels, too? YES!

My only real complaint is that the rooftop tends to get pretty loud on weekend nights. I turn into a pumpkin after about 11:30 PM or midnight, so if you’re like me I recommend having earplugs on hand.

Review: Don’t Miss a Stay at Mexiqui Hostel in Mexico City | A Wandering Foreigner

Mexiqui’s kitchen and common area

Review: Don’t Miss a Stay at Mexiqui Hostel in Mexico City | A Wandering Foreigner

Review: Don’t Miss a Stay at Mexiqui Hostel in Mexico City | A Wandering Foreigner

A peek at some of the restaurant’s in Mexiqui’s upscale cafeteria

Review: Don’t Miss a Stay at Mexiqui Hostel in Mexico City | A Wandering Foreigner

Other Things You Might Like to Know

During my stay, Mexiqui was still in the process of creating nightly and weekly events for guests. A few of the things that were starting the following week of my stay include:

  • Sunday evening rooftop wine and painting classes
  • A local bar crawl Wednesday through Saturday from 9 PM to 2 AM. The price is $300 MXP and includes your entrance to all locations and free shots
  • Mexican food cooking classes – so bummed I missed this one!

For more up-to-date information about these events, talk to the staff when you arrive.

There’s no place else I would have rather stayed during my time in Mexico City than at Mexiqui Hostel. The staff is friendly and knowledgeable, and the location doesn’t get much better. With one of the best views in the city, comfortable beds (although I wish they had more blankets), and two in-room lockers for belongings, a stay at Mexiqui makes for the complete Mexico City experience.

 

Review: Don’t Miss a Stay at Mexiqui Hostel in Mexico City | A Wandering Foreigner

A big thank you to Mexiqui Hostel and its staff for hosting my stay during my time in Mexico City! I can’t wait to return, explore more, and stay there again.

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